Small Talk Archive: April 2014

Around the World in 175 Days

wolverine supply and manufacturing company toys

Ninety years ago today, eight dapper pilots began the first flight around the world in four airplanes that were later nicknamed the “World Fliers:” the Seattle, Boston, New Orleans, and Chicago. After 74 pit stops, Chicago and New Orleans completed the journey over 175 days with an in-air flight time of 371 hours and 11 minutes. That may seem slow compared to today’s world record of 41 hours and 7 minutes, but in 1924 (still three years before Charles Lindbergh’s famous solo flight across the Atlantic) the sensational success of the World Fliers fueled excitement about airplanes.

Capitalizing on this interest (do you see a common theme appearing here?!), Wolverine Supply & Manufacturing Company began making “Aeroplane Race ‘Round the World,” a tin board game that mapped out the planes’ exact route. Armed with their own miniature World Flier, two to four players spun a dial to fly around the board hoping to avoid forced landings, storms, or any of the other maladies that grounded the real pilots on their journey. Much like the Oregon Trail video game for children of the 1980s and 1990s, children had fun while learning about the actual hardships of aerial circumnavigation. Although, unlike the Oregon Trail and the real World Flier pilots, there was no risk of dysentery from drinking lagoon water!

Where Did It Go?

Coleman dollhouse move

If you’ve been watching T/m’s Facebook page, then you know that the Colemans have moved out of their gigantic homestead. But this isn’t just any normal move; after every last item was lovingly packed, it was time to move the house. How do you move a nine-foot tall, seven-foot wide dollhouse?! The same way you would a real house: take it apart piece by piece (and mark each one very well), load it on a truck with a “Oversize Load” sign (ours fit in a U-Haul), and take it to its new location (in our case, temporary storage).

Lucky for us, Julie Denesha with KCUR Kansas City Public Media documented the move: check it out! If you can’t get enough of Coleman House, don’t miss T/m’s spotlight on Antiques Roadshow Monday, April 7 at 7pm CST where Coleman House serves as the backdrop for the appraiser’s analysis of two of our dollhouses.

Dollhouses for You and Me

dollhouse market

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, two companies dominated the dollhouse market: the R. Bliss Manufacturing Company of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and the Moritz Gottschalk company of Marienberg, Germany. Both companies were well known for their colorful houses, which sold at a lower price due to the decrease in production costs (thank you mass production!), making the toys available to a wide range of social classes.

This past summer, T/m hosted Antiques Roadshow and appraiser Marshall Martin to examine a Bliss dollhouse and a Gottschalk dollhouse from the museum collection. Catch it on your local PBS Station on Monday April 7 at 7pm CST or stay tuned here for a link to the segment.

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