Small Talk

A Time to Give

Toys for Tots

After Turkey Thursday, Black Friday, and Cyber Monday, it’s time to give back! Join thousands of people around the world in giving back to communities and organizations this Giving Tuesday. While we think we’re a great organization to support, we love supporting any organization that encourages imagination! Toys for Tots collects new toys each holiday season to distribute to children across the United States. The Toys for Tots Foundation received its official status as a U.S. Marine Corps program in 1995. Over the next ten years, the organization collected more than 469 million toys for more than 216 million children!

To participate in the 2014 drive, pick up a toy or two the next time you are out for deposit in an official drop-off bin near you. Conveniently, all Toys”R”Us and Babies”R”Us locations nationwide are Toys for Tots drop-off locations. Don’t have one nearby? You can donate money or purchase toys online to be included in the collection.

What’s the story, wishbones?

Victorian fancies

The superstition of wishing upon a wishbone can be traced back centuries to England, Rome and even ancient times. Anyone with siblings, cousins or even a surly aunt or uncle knows it’s always a race to see who gets the honor of pulling the wishbone apart. This set of wishbone furniture must have taken some of the drama out of family holidays!

A lot of turkeys and hens were were cooked up in order to collect enough wishbones to create this unique set of dollhouse furniture. In the 19th century, it became very fashionable for women to save up everyday scrap items like bones, feathers, and quills and turn them into spectacular crafts known as Victorian fancies. Sets of furniture like this one were some of the most popular Victorian fancies to make. After all, your dollhouse family needs tables and chairs for their Thanksgiving feast too!

A spot of tea, literally!

anchor jensen seattle

Here at T/m we’re continually amazed by the ‘little’ details found in every nook and corner of the Boston Beacon Hill House. This picture of the Paul Revere oval fluted teapot really demonstrates the scale of this ¼” miniature.

Designed and crafted by Seattle jeweler Anchor Jenson, the teapot features engravings, a hollow spout, and hinged lid. Smaller than a pencil eraser, the teapot is accompanied by a sugar and creamer which are comparable in size to grains of rice. Now that’s small! And lest you forget, like other miniatures, this functions exactly like it’s full size counterpart. However, silver is too small to polish, so this one is made out of white gold. A spot of tea anyone?

A Fresh Coat

the national museum of toys and miniatures renovation

It’s getting chilly out there, which means it’s just about time to march up to the attic or reach into the depths of your closet to unpack your winter coat. At T/m, we are treating ourselves to a brand new one this year- a fresh coat of paint that is! Throughout the month of November, painting crews have been spraying the exterior of the museum building a color called “Natural Cream.” Other ornate details will be come “Cottage Red.”

We hope the fresh new colors help the building “pop” and look more inviting. With much of the work on the exterior wrapping up for the winter, we’re gearing up for the daunting task of setting up the museum’s interior and exhibits. Stay warm and stay tuned for details!

A Southwestern Sanctuary

thorne rooms new mexico dining room

The famous miniature Thorne Rooms at the Art Institute of Chicago range from historical replicas influenced by patron and artist Narcissa Thorne’s travels abroad to striking reproductions of regional American home décor. These special rooms have been viewed, studied and enjoyed by generations (and even inspired a series of juvenile fiction books!).

The inspiration for one of our favorite works in the collection originates far from Thorne’s home in the Windy City. New Mexico Dining Room, c. 1940 includes small touches of both Pueblo Indian and Southwest American life, a style known as Pueblo Revival. Thorne’s eye for detail is not only apparent in the objects she chose to incorporate in the room setting, but also in the room construction itself. The kiva in the right corner of the room appears well-used with charring around its opening.  Colorful hand-loomed rugs, festively painted chairs, tiny retablos and intricately carved furniture all speak to the regional flavor that attracted many artists during New Mexico state’s early years.

Photo: Mrs. James Ward Thorne. A34: New Mexico Dining Room, c.1940. c.1940. The Art Institute of Chicago. Gift of Mrs. James Ward Thorne.

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