Small Talk

To Build a Better Mousetrap

To Build a Better Mousetrap

One of the earlier works of miniature artist William R. Robertson in T/m’s collection is his simple and beautiful Hepplewhite Mousetrap, created in 1979. Fashioned after a Georgian-era design, the work is comprised of wood and brass. Although it is on display in a separate case in our miniature gallery, it would fit right in to Robertson’s stately miniature Twin Manors.

The mousetrap is slightly smaller than an inch long and consists of 77 individual pieces. Of course, like many of Robertson’s other works, the mousetrap is fully functional. If an extra-tiny mouse (or maybe a small cricket!) were to crawl inside, the arm would unlatch to lower the front gate, trapping an unlucky critter. Since time began, inventers have always sought a way to “invent a better mousetrap.” We think this one really takes the cake, or the cheese as it were.

Don’t Cry, Tiny Tears

Don’t Cry, Tiny Tears

Introduced by the American Character Doll Company in 1950, Tiny Tears hit toy store shelves at the beginning of the Baby Boom. In the years to follow, Tiny Tears became one of America’s most popular dolls. Aside from her cute looks and features, the doll owed much of her success to the power of marketing. New York-based American Character Doll Company was quick to adapt to new television technology and advertised on popular shows like Ding Dong School and The Shari Lewis Show. A young Patty Duke was even a Tiny Tears spokesman (spokes-kid?) for a short time.

Of course the doll’s popularity also had a lot to do with how fun she was! Equipped with a rubber body and plastic head, Tiny Tears could drink from a bottle, wet her diaper, and, of course, cry liquid tears. The baby doll’s durability was popular with kids and parents alike and gave many little girls their practice shot at motherhood.

Ann’s Tiny Tears

Ann’s Tiny Tears

The personal playtime accounts from childhoods gone by are part of what makes our permanent exhibit Toys from the Attic: Stories of American Childhood so special. While each and every plaything in the collection must have some sort of story to tell, they often get lost in the shuffle of adulthood. You can probably imagine how many times we hear visitors say they wished they’d held onto that one special toy!

Local historian and longtime T/m volunteer docent Ann Smiley luckily held onto one of her most cherished toys, a small Tiny Tears doll. In the exhibit, Ann recounts playing with Tiny Tears in the early 1950s. Since she didn’t ever babysit or have children as an adult, she fondly thinks of her playtime with the doll as her sole motherhood experience. We’ll take a look at Tiny Tear’s unique features next time.

Inside a Cabinet of Curiosity

Inside a Cabinet of Curiosity

Pierre Mourey’s 1:12 scale Antwerp Cabinet is as beautifully decorated on the inside as on the outside. Its two exterior doors unlock to reveal fourteen dovetail-jointed drawers with brass pulls. The front of each of the drawers contains a miniature pastoral scene. The hinged top of the cabinet reveals a secret compartment with two more painted scenes and the letter “M” for Mourey.

Although they came in many different forms, full-scale curiosity cabinets were meant to store objects of fascination and entertainment such as coral, antique coins, and rare gems. Cabinets like these are considered the forerunners of modern museums. The miniature Antwerp Cabinet is on display in the museum’s Masterpiece Gallery, which is kind of like our own cabinet of curiosity.

Stuffed with Fluff

Stuffed with Fluff

Before he was the chubby, red-shirted, honey-loving yellow bear we all know and love today, Winnie the Pooh had his humble beginnings as a teddy bear. Author A. A. Milne purchased the stuffed bear at Harrods as a gift for his son, Christopher Robin, in 1921. Five years later, Pooh (who was named after a real bear at the zoo and a pet swan) and his friends Kanga, Tigger, Eeyore, and Piglet became characters and illustrations in Milne’s books.

The group of mohair, felt, and velveteen stuffed animals were sold by Milne’s publisher E. P. Dutton, and eventually donated to the New York Public Library. Earlier this year, in honor of Pooh’s 90th birthday, the library worked with a team of textile conservators to return the stuffed animals to how they looked when Christopher Robin played with them. As a result, Kanga’s neck was repaired, Piglet’s nose was reattached, Eeyore’s patches were replaced, and of course all of them were re-stuffed with fluff. All of the friends from the Hundred Acre Wood are now back on display at the NYPL Children’s Center for future generations to enjoy.

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