Small Talk

Tag, You’re It!

Worldwide Day of Play

NASA, IRS, NFL, CDC… need another acronym to keep track of?! How about WWDoP? WWDoP is short for Worldwide Day of Play, a concept created and promoted by Nickelodeon, home to kid-friendly programming and games. Started in 2004, the event encourages children from around the world to get away from the television and get physically active. Nickelodeon wholeheartedly invests in the day, suspending programming across all of its television channels and websites from noon to 3pm on WWDoP. Instead of SpongeBob SquarePants and Dora the Explorer, kids will see a message urging them to “get up, go outside and play”.

We don’t know about you, but we need no further encouragement! Tag, kickball, red rover, hide-and-seek, or double dutch anyone? We’ll see you on the playground on September 20, 2014 for the 11th Annual Worldwide Day of Play!

Photo: Tulane athletes playing kickball with Upward Bound Students, Tulane Public Relations, Wikimedia Commons

Hickory Dickory Dock

Clock from Boston Beacon Hill House

One of the more amazing pieces (okay, let’s be honest, we think they’re all amazing) in the Boston Beacon Hill House is a case clock by Frank Matter, modeled after a piece by Eli Terry. The case clock contains the world’s smallest watch movement, which was taken from a diamond bracelet watch by Jaeger-LeCoultre.

Boston Beacon Hill House is created on one of the smallest miniature scales, 1:48, which means that 1 inch in miniature equals 4 feet in the full-size world. It also means that artists such as Matter had to create on a super-small scale without going blind. Matter’s solution to this issue was that he made most of his pieces using tools he created himself. And while today’s miniature artists work under multiple levels of magnification, Matter created all of his works using little to no magnification!

Building a History of Toys

Randy Regier

Visual artist Randy Regier plays with the present and past by creating new, vintage-inspired toy sculptures which look as if they have existed for decades—obviously, we at the museum are big fans! We recently caught up with Regier to discuss some of his work and inspiration. Surprisingly, Regier explained that he didn’t own many toys growing up and rarely were those toys new. On one occasion when he brought home a good report card, he was allowed to buy a 1967 Rolls Royce Matchbox car. The bright yellow and blue box against the shiny cherry red car struck young Regier as something to be treasured. As a child Regier was influenced by 1960s and ’70s American pop culture as well as comic artists such as Bruce McCall and B. Kliban, who also used bright color palettes and witticism to provide social commentary.

Since new toys were a luxury, young Regier often built most of the toys he wanted to play with himself. The toys he made as a child helped him to imagine his future and articulate his observations about the landscape around him. As an adult, Regier uses the colors, designs, and aesthetic he grew up with to create his current body of work. Regier paraphrases Albert Camus when he describes his sculptures as his excuse to rediscover the things that have excited him throughout his entire life.

Look for Randy Regier’s artwork in State of the Art at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art until January 19, 2015.

Let’s Take a Stroll

McLoughlin Brothers Folding Dollhouse

Everyone loves a fabulous garden, even dolls! In the early 1900s, McLoughlin Brothers, Inc. produced the New Folding Dollhouse. Two stories tall and able to be constructed in a minute, the dollhouse’s special feature was its façade, which folded down to reveal an ornamental garden for the dollhouse occupants.

Like other manufacturers such as Bliss, the McLoughlin Brothers used chromolithography to produce their brightly colored cardboard dollhouses. With its color printed windows, bricks, and columns, this dollhouse serves as a time capsule of the decorative and architectural style of the late Victorian period. Bright colors, ornate decorations, and curtain-lined windows surround opulent rugs, cushioned window seats, and beautiful fireplaces. The house is sumptuous and pleasantly cluttered, two hallmarks of turn-of-the-century decorating. Try your hand at making your own tiny folding dollhouse with this template!

Toy or Miniature?

ToolChests

So, what is the difference between a toy and a fine-scale miniature? This is perhaps one of the most frequently asked questions we hear at the museum. Let’s take a quick look at a few pieces from the collection to illustrate the answer!

William Robertson’s miniature Hewitt “gentleman’s” chest and the American Manufacturing Concern’s (AMC) Elite Tool Chest for Boys are similar tool chests featuring dovetail joints. The most apparent difference is probably their size; the Elite Tool Chest measures a child-size 17 5/8” long, while Robertson’s 1-inch scale miniature measures a just a wee 2” long. Both chests are “real” tool chests in that they feature a full set of functioning tools which could be used to complete any number of carpentry projects. In fact, Robertson’s miniature includes all the same tools as the full-size Hewitt chest currently located at Colonial Williamsburg—the saw even has 160 teeth to the inch!

It probably goes without saying that these two tool chests are meant for two very different audiences. AMC mass produced the Elite Tool Chest to offer children— well, apparently only boys— size-appropriate tools for practicing their carpentry skills. Robertson’s Hewitt chest was created with no intention to actually use the tools, but rather to understand and study the skills traditional craftsmen used to handcraft everyday objects. You could probably say that both pieces were created to educate, but as very different teaching tools—pun intended!

Page 3 of 2312345...1020...Last »