Small Talk

Finely Furnished: The Tynietoy Company

Finely Furnished: The Tynietoy Company

Rhode Island was one of the most distinctive places for furniture-making in colonial America. It was only fitting that Marion Perkins and Amey Vernon founded the Tynietoy Company there in the 1920s. The female entrepreneurs capitalized on the colonial revival movement in America and began making high-quality wooden dollhouse furniture based on early American decorative arts movements.

Wing-back chairs, highboy cabinets, and four poster beds all found their way into dollhouses. Each piece of furniture was hand-painted by students at the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1923, the company standardized the dollhouse furniture to 1:12 scale (1 inch equals 1 foot in full-scale) and were produced in a variety of styles. Tynietoy’s high-end (and high-style) playthings sold at stores like Marshall Field’s and F.A.O. Schwarz. Upon Vernon’s passing in 1942, Perkins sold the company and by the early 1950s, Tynietoy had dissolved. Tynietoy dollhouses and furniture are (mostly) stamped with a trademark underneath and have become highly collectable today. Up next: a visit to T/m’s Tynietoy Georgian style dollhouse!

Seeing Double: The Devil’s in the Details

Seeing Double: The Devil’s in the Details

And details there are! We’ve never tried it ourselves, but given a steady hand and a pair of tweezers, each microscopic door latch in Twin Manors can be locked with a sliver of a key. Every window glides open in its frame except for two fake windows on each side of the façade. These provide symmetry to the home, which was a very important aspect of Georgian-era design. And artist William R. Robertson even painted the brickwork with pigment made from the dust of 18th century brick!

Next time you visit T/m look closely and you can see a sampler in the back hallway by Robertson’s mom Esther Robertson. The sampler commemorates the completion of the two houses; the one in T/m’s home is dated 1989 for the first year the manor was on display. Come see it for yourself August 1, 2015 when the museum reopens!

Oh, You Beautiful Bricks

Oh, You Beautiful Bricks

There seems to be no limit to what you can build with LEGO bricks. In recent years, a major traveling exhibition of fantastical LEGO sculptures has graced museums nationwide. Additionally, LEGOLAND Discovery Centers popping up across the world allow fans to unleash their inner architect. In 2013, master builders at LEGO even built a life-sized Star Wars X-Wing entirely out of the inches-long plastic bricks!

LEGO’s versatility inspired graphic designer Mike Doyle to spend hours creating his fantastical and artistic designs. One of his major works was inspired by the housing crisis in 2009: dilapidated Victorian houses built entirely in grayscale colored bricks (without paint or glue!). Doyle decided to combine his two passions in a new book entitled, Beautiful LEGO.  The book features everything from fantastical science fiction scenes to life-like food sculptures. In addition to featuring his own work Doyle solicited images from aspiring LEGO artists around the world.

Photo: Mike Doyle, Courtesy of No Starch Press.

Seeing Double: Dining in a Manor

Seeing Double: Dining in a Manor

Like the rest of Twin Manors, the dining room took inspiration from 18th century homes: Wilton-on-the-James (c. 1753 in Virginia) and Wentworth-Gardner House (c. 1760 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire). The paneling on the back wall contains approximately 250 pieces of wood. Look closely and you can see the hidden doorway leading to the pantry in the back hallway on the left wall.

Not to be outdone for the holidays, Twin Manors has historically accurate Christmas decorations. Every holiday season the T/m staff decks the manor’s halls with swags and fruit arrangements (well, not real fruit… that wouldn’t be great for the art). The dining room chandelier is replaced with a Christmas chandelier and a festive bonbon centerpiece adorns the table along with a Williamsburg pineapple centerpiece.

In Pursuit of Fun

In Pursuit of Fun

Inspired by the popular board game, the Betty Brinn Children’s Museum partnered with Hasbro, Inc. to create Trivial Pursuit®: A 50-State Adventure. The interactive exhibit highlights unique facts about the states. Did you know that Trivial Pursuit originated from a Scrabble night gone wrong. Facing a game with missing pieces, two members of The Canadian Press set about creating their own board game. Two years after its release, the game had sold more than 20 million copies, establishing itself as a household name.

On view now at the Strong Museum of Play, exhibit visitors find their way through a series of games, puzzles, and trivia questions similar to those found in the traditional game. You can dress like a pioneer and climb into a covered wagon in Nebraska, or play a pinball game of baseball in Boston’s Fenway Park. There’s even a display that lets you change a tire in the Indianapolis 500 – minus the pressure of a ticking course clock and screaming fans, of course.

Photo: Trivial Pursuit Cards. Dirk1981, Wikimedia Commons.

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