Small Talk

Teddy Bear Tales

Teddy Bear Tales

Who exactly protects us from those things that go “bump” in the night as kids? According to comic artists Nick Davis and Dan Nokes, “He has amber eyes, yet he never blinks, a smiley mouth, yet never talks. And if you look closely enough, you can see a little white stuffing poking out of his portly-shaped belly.” Davis and Nokes created a dream team of monster-fighting heroes with an unlikely source as its leader: a teddy bear named Tristan.  Calling themselves the Cuddly Defenders, the gang of plush toys defends children from the dangers of monsters under the bed in a quarterly, 24-page epic series.

The project received funding this past November through a Kickstarter campaign. Now in full production, the ever-expanding comic series is available online. Fans of the series (or those who may have a monster under the bed) can also purchase handmade plush versions of their favorite characters on the site.

Photo: Courtesy of Nick Davis.

Details in the Miniature Madame

Details in the Miniature Madame

As mentioned previously on SmallTalk, artist Johannes Landman’s painting of Madame de Pompadour replicates the 1756 portrait by François Boucher in stunning 1:12 scale. The original work was commissioned by King Louis XV of France to commemorate his mistress, Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, being named as the queen’s lady-in-waiting. Boucher’s portrait depicts the lounging Marquise wearing a teal dress dotted with pink roses. Known as one of the best-read women of her time, she is surrounded by numerous books and writing tools.

While much of Landman’s work, including this painting, emulate masterworks down to the fabric folds and flower petals, he always leaves his own unique mark on a painting. See if you can play “Spot the Difference” between the original work and the miniature. We can spot at least three!

17 Winter Street’s Kitchen

17 Winter Street’s Kitchen

Over time, dollhouse contents can get separated from their original dollhouse. While we try our best at T/m to play a successful game of “Are You My Mother?,” we aren’t always victorious. So, we tried our best to locate contents that were representative of the furnishings that Mamie Burt may have used in her dollhouse.

Mamie’s kitchen was already quite spectacular with a dry sink, faux painted cabinets, a brick hearth, and a trough for mixing bread dough. The contents chosen to furnish Mamie’s house included what we think is a spectacular set of food (although probably not the tastiest). Using a lot of imagination, some little boy or girl designed this spread using some very pretty rocks. Yes, you read that right, rocks! We’d guess it’s a feast of ham with a side of lettuce and some delicacy with a drool-worthy crust garnished with capers. But, that’s just what our imagination would say!

Toys Take the Stage

Toys Take the Stage

Given how much children love playtime, it seems logical that a teacher would want to incorporate more toys into their classroom lesson plans. The Toy Museum: A Mini Musical offers instructors the ability to do just that. Whether it’s language arts, social studies, performing arts, or the concept of sharing, the play (about playing) offers an educational experience for students from pre-K to third grade.

The event’s main character, Queen Marlene, guides the audience through magical stories of toy history, and a large doll, Rosie Rascal, stirs up trouble for the rest of the characters on stage. The show was written and produced by the Toy of Museum of NY’s founder Marlene Hochman. A strong believer in the power of toys as educational tools, Hochman told The New York Times, “If we let our young children today sit in front of a computer or to play with electronic games, we are not giving them the opportunity to think on their own or to create on their own. It’s already preprogrammed, so what kind of inventors are we going to have?”

Photo: Courtesy of the Toy Museum of NY.

Painting the Miniature Madame

Painting the Miniature Madame

T/m’s miniature painting of Madame de Pompadour glows like the oil paintings of the Old Masters. The artist, Johannes Landman, has been known to label himself a perfectionist and his own “worst critic” when it comes to his art. He pays attention to every detail within his paintings to masterfully achieve the subtle color changes found in works such as Madame de Pompadour.

Although strikingly similar, the original full-scale painting by François Boucher was painted on canvas, whereas the miniature is painted on a wooden panel. Landman exclusively uses wood because he feels the texture of canvas would be too bold for 1:12 scale work. To prep the wood surface, Landman applied several layers of a white paint mixture called gesso as a primer, sanding each layer after it dried. Then, using ultra-fine 000 size brushes he layers on the oil paints until he is satisfied with the final product. Stay tuned as we explore more of the mini madame’s lovely qualities.

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