Small Talk

Cut Along the Lines

Cut Along the Lines

Just when you felt that you would never be able to tackle coloring in the lines, kindergarten threw another curveball at you: cutting along the dotted lines. A hard task to tackle, especially with kiddie scissors, but an essential one for playing with paper dolls. The kids who played with the paper dolls in T/m’s newest exhibit were well-seasoned line cutters!

Stereotypes to Civil Rights: Black Paper Dolls in America documents the 150-year evolution of cultural images of African Americans from Little Black Sambo and Aunt Jemima to Jackie Robinson and Beyoncé Knowles. Catch a glimpse into the history of racial perceptions with more than 100 dolls from the collection of noted author, lecturer, and collector Arabella Grayson on view from February 20, 2016 through August 21, 2016.

Lights, Camera, Miniatures!

Lights, Camera, Miniatures!

Like T/m, Lyon, France’s Musée Miniature et Cinéma features two distinct, yet related collections. Rather than toys, this French museum collects, conserves, and displays a variety of cinema props and objects, many of which are actually miniatures in their own right. For generations, filmmakers have used small-scale models and dioramas as a less expensive alternative to filming in an exotic location, or using full-scale props, or computer-generated imagery. Miniatures can have a use beyond just art you know!

The other half of the collection at Musée Miniature et Cinéma focuses on fine-scale miniatures, many of which were created by the museum’s founder, Dan Ohlmann. Formally trained as a cabinetmaker, Ohlmann works in a variety of media, and is especially drawn to the curvaceous (and difficult to recreate!) Art Nouveau style. Operating in a historic sixteenth-century building, the museum also houses a workshop for miniature artisans, who at the moment are collaborating on a scaled-down version of the Brasserie Georges.
Photo: Restaurant Maxim’s de Paris, Dan Ohlmann. Courtesy of Musée Miniature et Cinéma.

Rolling Out Adaptive Toys

Rolling Out Adaptive Toys

Toys can teach us lots of important life skills: how to run a household, how to change a diaper, and even how to delicately remove a wish bone. While kids are busy playing, toys simultaneously aid fundamental cognitive and motor skill development. As Mr. Rogers once said, “Play is really the work of childhood.”

For some kids with physical or mental disabilities the benefits of play can be harder to come by. Often, store-bought toys don’t accommodate for special conditions such as autism, cerebral palsy, Spina Bifida and muscular dystrophy. Enter the Adaptive Toy Project, an initiative through the University of North Florida’s (UNF) Neurodevelopment Systems course that modifies toys for children with disabilities, allowing ease of play. Student teams at UNF have retrofitted motorized toys with adaptive technologies that were custom designed with a specific child in mind. Know a child that would benefit from one of these custom cruisers? Referrals to the Adaptive Toy Project can be made through a licensed physical therapist.
Photo: Courtesy of University of North Florida.

A New Frontier for Fun

A New Frontier for Fun

In the 1930s, science fiction captivated the American imagination with the fantastical outer space adventures of Buck Rodgers and Flash Gordon… and we’ve been hooked ever since. After World War II, the Space Race between the United States and the Soviet Union turned the public’s attention to the very real possibility of traveling to the moon and beyond. So, not surprisingly, toymakers both at home and abroad capitalized on the “final frontier” of imaginative play.

Space toys during the mid-twentieth century came in a variety of forms. Some were more realistic like molded plastic NASA playsets, while others seemed to be ripped from the pages of a sci-fi comic book like flying saucers and outer space robots. The period also witnessed a shift from domestic toy production to imported Japanese-made toys. For example, T/m’s tin “Flying Saucer with Space Pilot” was made by Japanese firm Yoshiya, but bears the name of its American importer, Cragston. We’ll explore some of the intergalactic features of this toy soon, so set your phasors to be stunned!

American Folk Art Murals in Miniature

American Folk Art Murals in Miniature

It is believed that the home’s namesake, Ezra Carroll, commissioned the artfully adorned walls in the Ezra Carroll House. Located on a busy east-west thoroughfare near the store he owned, Carroll occupied the home from 1815 until his death in 1844. During this time, he hired itinerant painter William Price to paint the walls of his home.

While all the rage in England and France, scenic wallpaper was expensive to import and difficult to get your hands on. Ever resourceful, Americans folk artists in New York and New England found a DIY solution worthy of a 21st-century pin: hand-painting oil landscapes directly onto dry plaster.

While we know very little about Price, we do know he is the murals’ artist thanks to his signing and dating the work. Some scholars think he may be the same William H. Price that is listed as living in New York City in 1844, and that he may have been a veteran of the War of 1812 because of his depiction of Commander Perry’s victory at the Battle of Lake Erie in one of the murals. Scholars assume that he took inspiration from local and exotic scenic views in order to duplicate the French’s elaborate wallpapers.

Page 8 of 56« First...678910...203040...Last »