Small Talk / Inspiration

Perfect for a Petite Appetite

Kawaii food

We love food. But a museum, fine-scale artwork, and food don’t exactly mix. Until now. Introducing kawaii cooking (no surprise here, kawaii is Japanese for cute), which uses real-life ingredients and miniature stoves, pots, pans, and utensils to create tiny, edible dishes. Smaller than your Easy Bake Oven, these miniature stoves are powered by tea lights or small flames.

We hope you have a small appetite for dumplings, spaghetti bolognese, cheeseburgers, and crepes. Just like any good cooking show, the sets change to match the recipe! Want to try it at home? Fire up your favorite internet browser! Most of the ingredients and utensils used in the videos are purchased in Japan.

Photo: AAAjoken YouTube channel.

Randy Hage’s New York Storefronts

Randy Hage

For decades, artists have been inspired by the bright lights and bustling streets of New York City. Visual artist Randy Hage is no exception. Hage spent 25 years creating sets, models, and props for television and film before a trip to New York in the late 1990s led him to his next project.

Originally photographing cast iron facades for future art projects, he became entranced by storefronts and the stories that they told. On subsequent trips, he found these ‘mom and pop’ stores disappearing, pushed out by big box stores and rising rents. So, he decided to recreate them in 1:12 scale as a permanent reminder of the establishments and the people who lived in them and served their community.

The results have blown us away, and we challenge you to determine which is the original and which is the miniature.
Photo: NYC Bodega in Miniature, courtesy of Randy Hage.

First-Class Miniatures

Gingerbread House Stamps

Every December, we get pretty excited to see the latest gingerbread house creations that pop up on social media. After all, they are miniature structures, and they’re covered in candy and frosting! Miniature artist Teresa Layman is well-known for her intricately sweet houses—she’s even written a couple books on how to make them yourself.

Several years back, Layman asked her local postmaster about how postage stamp designs were chosen. The process begins with the submission of ideas to the Citizen’s Advisory Stamp Committee, and then a lot of waiting. Luckily, Layman’s postmaster put her in contact with a Postal Service stamps photographer who just happened to live a mile away. The photographer, Sally Andersen-Bruce, worked with Layman and USPS art director Derry Noyes over the course of a couple years to create a winning combination of four perfectly delectable gingerbread houses for the 2013 holiday season. How sweet is that!?
Photo: USPS.com

Dollhouse Therapy

Dollhouses for Kids Battling Cancer

What started as a hobby, became a cause and grew into a movement. In 2006, a woman named Ann made her first dollhouse. Having enjoyed making it, but having no real purpose for it, she sold it at a loss. Her daughter, who was working with children undergoing chemo at the nearby hospital, suggested that next time she donate it to the hospital.

In no time, Dollhouses For Kids Battling Cancer was born. As of 2014, Ann had made and donated more than 336 dollhouses to children in 21 states, and even Canada! Several businesses have partnered with Ann to provide her with supplies, including The Magical Dollhouse.

But Ann couldn’t get the dollhouses to the kids without the help of her “Dollhouse Delivery Angels.” She has 105 angels in 37 states that help transport the dollhouses from Ann’s home in New York across the country. Each angel drives an average of 489 miles to deliver dollhouses. We think they’re all angels; check out Ann’s Facebook page to see how you can join their ranks!
Photo: Courtesy of Dollhouses For Kids Battling Cancer.

Time’s Most Influential Toys

Time Magazine Most Influential

Last year, Time magazine interviewed toy historians and experts to come up with the most influential toys of all time. They defined influential as toys that had the biggest impact on the toy industry and the world at large.

The list included a lot of toys that were “firsts:” Chatty Cathy was the first talking doll. G.I. Joe was the first doll for boys… oops… we mean “action figure.” The Easy Bake Oven allowed kids to make edible food for the first time. Doc McStuffins was the first black doll to become popular among kids of all races. And Cabbage Patch dolls were the first toys not tied to popular culture that everyone had to have.

Others like Leap Pad, Rubik’s Cube, View-Master, Star Wars figurines, Super Soaker, Nerf Bow and Arrow, Barbie, and LEGO made the list for their sheer popularity, for becoming not only toys, but collectibles, or for starting a movement. That’s a powerful bunch of toys.

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