Small Talk / Miniature

An Art Nouveau Spring

Linda LaRoche jardiniere miniature

As everyone begins dreaming of warmer weather and flowers blooming, we thought we’d take a look at Linda LaRoche’s jardinière. Your gardening plans may even involve a jardinière, a large usually ceramic flowerpot holder. Jardinières, from the French feminine form of gardener, tend to be highly decorated like LaRoche’s replica of Flora Marina, Flora Exotica by Emile Gallé.

Flora Marina, Flora Exotica was presented at the 1889 World’s Fair in Paris and now resides in Musée de l’École de Nancy. Devoted to the Nancy Art Nouveau movement founded in 1901 by several artists (including Gallé) in Nancy, Lorraine, France, the museum has over 400 of his glass and ceramic works. T/m houses the miniature version of the work that was 14 years in the making; see just what went into this specially commissioned piece over the next several weeks.

Furnishing The House That Abe Built

allison ashby steve jedd

Allison Ashby and Steve Jedd not only searched for information about the cabin structure when they delved into the National Park Service’s archives; they were also searching for information about the interior. Most of the items in the home, with the exception of the spinning wheel, pottery, weaving, and food, were made by Ashby and Jedd.

The corner cabinet in the back, left corner of the cabin is modeled after a piece by Abe’s father, Thomas Lincoln, who was a cabinetmaker. The pegs in the back wall are a homemade ladder that the boys, Abe and his step-brother John, used to climb to the loft where they slept. The artists decided to include the pegs after reading accounts that Lincoln wrote about watching the snow through the roof shingles.

Replicating The House That Abe Built

miniature replica of Abraham Lincoln’s boyhood home

Steve Jedd estimates that he and Allison Ashby spent roughly 800 hours on their miniature replica of Abraham Lincoln’s boyhood home. During a visit to The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures in 2011, the artists told us that their work is illusion, that the scale, especially the scale of the wood grain and the wood’s durability, is more important than the authenticity of the materials.

Ashby and Jedd built Lincoln’s cabin from the ground up with a stone foundation and fireplace of carved and painted basswood, and door and windows of beech. They used old Cyprus for the flooring because it looks like pine. And in order to make the logs look hand hewn, they took cedar lumber, cut it down to length, and then used hammers, chisels, and wire brushes to make it look weathered.

The House That Abe Built

allison ashby steve jedd miniature log cabin

Miniature artists Allison Ashby and Steve Jedd’s love for miniatures lies in the stories and history behind the objects they miniaturize. We’ll be using this very Presidential month here at Small Talk to explore the creation of a presidential home. Nope, its not a neoclassical Federal style white home in Washington, D.C, but it is a National Park Service Historic Site.

In 1816, Abraham Lincoln’s family moved from Kentucky to this cabin in Southern Indiana. From the age of 7 to 21, Lincoln helped (alright you caught us… his dad built it, but he helped!) carve a farm and home out of the frontier forests. Ashby and Jedd spent time in the National Park Service’s archives for information on the cabin and then spent two and a half days taking photographs, measuring, and drawing the cabin (with permission of course). Check back here to find out how many hours the artist spent building this miniature!

Love Chest Revisited

linda laroche james hastrich

We always feel very fortunate here at The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures when artists give us a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of their masterpieces like this Hadley Chest by James Hastrich and Linda LaRoche. In order to accurately reproduce historical pieces such as the Hadley Chest at Historic Deerfield, museums grant artists access to collection objects so they can take detailed measurements and photographs.

In service to scale, miniature artists substitute woods like plum, pear, cherry and boxwood for the smaller grain. The smaller, tighter grain creates the same effect as the soft maple, chestnut, oak and white pine used on the full scale Hadley Chest.

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