Small Talk Tag: Doll

Meet Our Friendship Doll

Mrs F

As part of the 1927 international doll exchange between the U.S. and Japan, 58 Japanese dolls traveled to the U.S., and were distributed coast to coast amongst museums and public venues. On a diplomatic mission to promote peace and understanding between the two countries, these ichimatsu ningyo became known as the Japanese Friendship Dolls.

Just who were they? Let us introduce you… each doll represented a different Japanese city, prefecture or territory. Expertly designed and constructed by Japanese artists, the dolls stand 32” high, have wigs of human hair, and glass eyes. Each had her own set of accessories, including a traditional tea set, travel trunk, and a richly styled kimono. Look closely at each doll’s kimono to find a unique mon, or crest, repeated in the pattern (sort of like the Houses at Hogwarts)!

The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures is home to Miss Fukushima, one of the Friendship Dolls representing a Japanese prefecture. We’re proud to have “Miss F.” here at the museum, as she is one of the most intact of the original 1927 group. Over 40 of Miss Fukushima’s original accessories came with her to T/m including two tea sets, a sewing kit, and even a booklet entitled “Japanese Children and Dolls’ Tea-service.”

Strike a Pose

French Fashion Dolls

While we think all of our dolls are quite fashionable, a special set of Parisian dolls take the cake! Dating from 1900 to 1917, the dolls produced by Mesdames Louise Lafitte and Augusta Désirat represent different fashions and themes from “nurse” to “theatre.” The dolls were sold in the United States at the Gimbels department store as “style mannequins.”

The dolls’ bodies are wire armatures with wax heads and simple painted features to guarantee that the clothes and accessories are the star! And star they do; the two sisters styled their dolls with only the finest materials: ostrich feathers, fur, velvet, mohair, lace, and silk. Each doll strikes a pose on a round wood base that is often marked with a year, signature, and stamp (which really helps us out here at T/m!). Whether standing or sitting on a chair or cushion, these ladies are runway ready.

Diplomatic Dolls

Miss Shimane Japanese friendship ambassador doll, The Children's Museum of Indianapolis.

Decades before Hello Kitty captured the hearts of Americans, a fleet of Japanese dolls came to America to promote peace and ease cultural tensions. In the 1920s, anti-immigrant sentiments and cultural differences between Japan and America were coming to a head. An American missionary named Sidney Gulick proposed a doll exchange with Japan in order to open an avenue for peaceful communication. In 1927, American school children sent 12,000 “American Blue-Eyed Dolls” to Japan just in time to celebrate Hina Matsuri. Millions of Japanese children were so enthralled with the dolls that they donated money to create dolls to be sent to America, and thus the Japanese Friendship Dolls were born! Each doll represented a different Japanese prefecture, city, or colony and came with beautifully designed accessories such as teapots, parasols, and chests. (T/m is now home to one of these dolls, Miss Fukushima!)

Unfortunately, the diplomacy of the American Blue-Eyed Dolls and the Japanese Friendship Dolls did not last. When World War II broke out years later, dolls from the exchange were considered inappropriate to display, or even treasonous to possess. Many dolls were lost or destroyed. Those that remained safe through the years are now considered highly collectible. See some of them on exhibit in The Japanese Woodblock Print: An Extension of the Impermanent at the Montana Museum of Art & Culture on view now through April 19, 2014.

Photo: Miss Shimane Japanese Friendship Ambassador Doll, The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, Wikimedia Commons.

Durable Daisy

Schoenhut Doll

We’re going to take a break from Schoenhut’s playsets to take a look at another extension of the toymaker’s offerings: an unbreakable all-wood doll. The jointed Schoenhut All-Wood Perfection Art Doll was advertised in a 1911 catalogue with a “new patent steel spring hinge, having double spring tension and swivel connection.” This meant the doll could pose in many human-like positions. Holes in the bottom of the doll’s feet allowed them to pose flat-footed or on tip toe with a special doll stand.

While wood might not seem all that loveable, Schoenhut’s process of carving and burning away the rough wood left the surface as smooth as glass. The dolls were modeled after real children and painted with enamel oil colors so they could be washed easily after a messy tea party. The first dolls were 16 inches and came either dressed or undressed in modern children’s styles for $2 to $5. T/m’s Schoenhut doll Daisy was donated to the museum by her original owner Dorothy who received her as a Christmas gift. Daisy, who was named after Dorothy’s mother, went on many adventures before coming to us!

Tête-à-Tête with Tête Jumeau Bébé

Tete Jumeau Mechanical Doll

In case your French is a little rusty (ok, we had to look it up too!), tête is the French word for head. This beautiful porcelain doll’s head was made by French dollmaker Pierre Francoise Jumeau in the 1880s. Dolls (or bébés) made by the Jumeau firm were known for their soft, expressive facial features and were most often made of bisque porcelain.

This particular bébé is not only pretty and well-dressed, but she’s also an automaton! The body of the doll contains clockwork mechanisms that are wound with a key to make her move. Automata tend to have somewhat slow and jerky movements that may seem a bit creepy or strange to us today, but dolls like this one were a popular form of entertainment in the 18th to early 20th centuries. It’s a good thing she’s so lovely to look at!

Page 1 of 212