Small Talk Tag: Furniture

Bitty Belter Furniture

belter furniture

Thomas Warner once explained his attraction to the Belter style: “I have to be able to capture the ‘feel’ that the original had. I think that’s why I enjoy the Belter designs so much. Its quality is massive—yet the intricate carvings make it ‘feel’ so delicate. It’s capturing the delicateness in such a heavy piece that is the true art—and the source of my genuine feeling of accomplishment.”

The center table in the Belter Parlor took about 40 hours to complete! Warner mainly used rosewood for the elaborate pierced carvings of the Belter style. John Belter himself favored rosewood and its ability to be bent and shaped without splitting or cracking like a more solid wood. In 1856, Belter patented a lamination process that allowed layers of wood to be more easily steamed into curves and carved.

Warner pieces’ replicate the intricate carvings of Belter furniture: multitude of grapes, vines, scrolls, and not a straight line in sight! If you are lucky enough to find a piece of Warner’s fine-scale miniature furniture (he produced limited quantities), it’ll be easy to tell it’s his: Warner signed all of his pieces.

A Bitty Belter Parlor

Belter style

In 1982, Thomas Warner completed the Belter Parlor, so named for the style of furniture by John Henry Belter that adorns the room. Warner’s work was also inspired by many of his fellow miniature artists, including Harry Cooke, John Davenport, Arlyn Coad, and Hermania Anslinger.

The Belter Parlor features hand carved, detailed reproductions of Belter’s circa 1850 designs. In June 1987, Warner told Nutshell News that the Belter Parlor holds the best pieces he had ever created.

Warner became a miniature-making team with his wife Gloria Warner. If one didn’t like to or couldn’t do one aspect of a miniature, the other one could. Gloria often upholstered the furniture that Thomas carved. In the Belter Parlor, Gloria also made the drapes, while Henry Whalon made the rugs.

Just a Quick Cat Nap

miniature cat bed

There is certainly no shortage of cats on the internet these days, but we like to think this miniature cat lounging in its bed takes the prize for one of the most fabulous! The Louis XVI style canopy bed was created in 1:12 scale by artist Bernd Franke. The wooden features of the bed are hand carved and gilded in a neoclassical design, typical of the late eighteenth century. Two cylindrical bolster pillows keep this kitty comfy on the geometrical patterned upholstery, another hallmark of the period.

The fluffy white cat curled up on the bed was made by artist Tina Selden Nickel using modeling compound covered in real fur. It’s hard to imagine a real cat not going crazy over dangling ostrich feathers, ribbons, bows, and silk fringe, but one thing’s for sure: this cat bed is decadent enough to make the Fancy Feast cat jealous!

A Bitty Baby House

miniature baby house

Contrary to what the name might lead you to believe, this 1:12 scale miniature isn’t actually meant to represent a “house for babies.” The term baby house refers to 17th and 18th-century dollhouses, typically in the Netherlands and England. This early type of dollhouse was usually a wooden cabinet on legs, with compartments decorated and furnished like a miniature estate.

This Baby House was constructed by artist Gilbert Mena. It features turned legs and finials and two functional doors decorated with one-point perspective marquetry scenes. The rooms within the baby house were made by artist Nell Corkin, who had the task of miniaturizing furnishings that would have been already tiny in full-scale! If you look closely, you’ll find diminutive delftware, two neatly made beds, and even a dollhouse pet resting on a pillow.

From Whittling to Wood Carving: Tudor Furniture

Tudor Furniture

In addition to the beautiful wood carvings adorning this Tudor bedroom’s walls and ceiling, Thomas Warner crafted the furniture. The chairs with crossed legs and the four-poster bed’s ornate details are carved out of walnut. The bible stand, or prie-dieu, is also intricately carved with a cross and features a slanted and hinged top.

Additional miniature artists lent their skills to furnish the room with rich textiles: needlework from Annelle Ferguson, upholstery by Frank Hanley and Jeffery Gueno (of Le Chateau Interiors), and an embroidery frame and gold jewel box by William R. Robertson.

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