Small Talk Tag: Games

Crack the Code

Little Orphan Annie Secret Decoder Pin

Decades before Saturday morning cartoons or video games, kids and families would gather around the radio to listen to dramatically narrated stories, called serials. One of the popular serials of the 1930s followed the adventures of Orphan Annie and her dog Sandy. Even back then, no popular children’s program was without its share of branded merchandise and premium toys. The classic 1983 movie A Christmas Story depicted the main character Ralphie impatiently waiting to receive his Little Orphan Annie Secret Society decoder pin in the mail.

This 1938 edition of the Telematic Radio Orphan Annie Pin has two holes that reveal corresponding numbers and letters on a dial. The codes read during the end of the radio program could be deciphered by turning the dial to reveal the secret letter. Contrary to the disappointing Ovaltine message received by Ralphie in the movie, the actual codes gave a clue to what would happen in the next Radio Orphan Annie program. Visitors to the museum’s “Toys from the Attic: Stories of American Childhood” exhibit can view this pin along and decipher a message of their own (and we promise it’s not a crummy commercial)!

The Wonderful World of Walter Wick

Walter Wick exhibit

Anyone who has been to a Scholastic Book Fair in the last 20 years knows the joys of the I Spy and Can You See What I See? books. Think of the hours spent combing the pages for each meticulously placed object! The photographer behind the juvenile book series, Walter Wick, is featured in a retrospective exhibition at the Shelburne Museum this summer.

Walter Wick: Games, Gizmos and Toys in the Attic is a feast for the eyes comprised of Wick’s large-scale photographs and whimsical dioramas. Visitors of all ages are invited to search the visual puzzles for optical illusions and ever-elusive toys. Wick explained that the exhibit’s title “not only describes the contents of the show, but the contents of my head.” We hope he has no plans to declutter anytime soon!
Photo: Walter Wick, Mirror Maze from I Spy Fun House, 1993. Pigmented Inkjet Photograph, 50 x 36 in. Copyright Wick Studio. Organized by the New Britain Museum of American Art.

In Pursuit of Fun

trivial pursuit

Inspired by the popular board game, the Betty Brinn Children’s Museum partnered with Hasbro, Inc. to create Trivial Pursuit®: A 50-State Adventure. The interactive exhibit highlights unique facts about the states. Did you know that Trivial Pursuit originated from a Scrabble night gone wrong. Facing a game with missing pieces, two members of The Canadian Press set about creating their own board game. Two years after its release, the game had sold more than 20 million copies, establishing itself as a household name.

On view now at the Strong Museum of Play, exhibit visitors find their way through a series of games, puzzles, and trivia questions similar to those found in the traditional game. You can dress like a pioneer and climb into a covered wagon in Nebraska, or play a pinball game of baseball in Boston’s Fenway Park. There’s even a display that lets you change a tire in the Indianapolis 500 – minus the pressure of a ticking course clock and screaming fans, of course.

Photo: Trivial Pursuit Cards. Dirk1981, Wikimedia Commons.

The Thief’s Delight

william morris strawberry thief wallpaper

File this one under “dream job!” Did you know that the V&A Museum has a Games Designer in Residence? Last October, Sophie George completed six months of research and created an interactive iPad experience to accompany an exhibit. The game is now available to the public in the Apple App Store.

The game, called “Strawberry Thief,” draws inspiration from a textile by the same name. A notable contributor to the British textile revival in the 1800s, William Morris’s wallpaper and textile designs transcended his time. His famous organic, repeating patterns continue to influence designers and artists today. Players and visitors to the museum can use their figure tips to draw and color the fabric’s intricate patterns. When the work is done, the image zooms out revealing the re-worked Morris piece in its entirety.
Photo: Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum. © Sophia George.

Tag, You’re It!

worldwide day of play 2014

NASA, IRS, NFL, CDC… need another acronym to keep track of?! How about WWDoP? WWDoP is short for Worldwide Day of Play, a concept created and promoted by Nickelodeon, home to kid-friendly programming and games. Started in 2004, the event encourages children from around the world to get away from the television and get physically active. Nickelodeon wholeheartedly invests in the day, suspending programming across all of its television channels and websites from noon to 3pm on WWDoP. Instead of SpongeBob SquarePants and Dora the Explorer, kids will see a message urging them to “get up, go outside and play”.

We don’t know about you, but we need no further encouragement! Tag, kickball, red rover, hide-and-seek, or double dutch anyone? We’ll see you on the playground on September 20, 2014 for the 11th Annual Worldwide Day of Play!

Photo: Tulane athletes playing kickball with Upward Bound Students, Tulane Public Relations, Wikimedia Commons

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