Small Talk Tag: Games

Nintendo Nostalgia

Nintendo Exhibit

When you hear the name Nintendo, you probably think of the iconic, gray video game console, a pair of mustached plumbers, and maybe even that snickering dog from Duck Hunt (what a jerk!). Surprisingly, Nintendo’s games go much further back: 125 years back with a deck of playing cards! Nintendo’s products included an electronic “Love Tester” and arcade games before they made it big with their home game console, the Nintendo Entertainment System, in 1985.

Nintendo’s games, characters, and even the consoles themselves continue to resonate with new generations of players. The Strong’s International Center for the History of Electronic Games and Ritsumeikan University in Japan have produced an exhibit celebrating the Nintendo Entertainment System’s 30 year anniversary. Visitors can view some of the early NES design plans, watch an interview with a Nintendo hardware designer, and play several games like Super Mario Bros. 1, 2, and 3, and Mario Kart Arcade GP. The best part? You won’t have to blow on any of the cartridges in order to play the games!
Photo: Courtesy of The Strong®, Rochester, New York.

Get Your Game Face On

Hasbro Gaming lab

In 2015, Hasbro announced a new competition that was right up our alley: design a great game. They partnered with Indiegogo to find the next face-to-face party game. In order to run the competition, they founded the Hasbro Gaming Lab with the mission to discover and develop great new games, connect with the gaming community, and bring fresh experiences to gamers everywhere. Count us in!

After over 500 submissions, Dan Goodsell and his game, Irresponsibility – the Mr. Toast Card Game, took home the grand prize. Irresponsibility is a fast-paced card game for 2-4 players. Featuring Dan’s fun illustrations of his character, Mr. Toast, and his friends, the first player to gather 15 points wins. We’ll be first in line to buy Dan’s game when it premieres. And we may just start thinking about our next big party game idea in case Hasbro decides to have another challenge.
Photo: Courtesy of Hasbro.

 

Crack the Code

Little Orphan Annie Secret Decoder Pin

Decades before Saturday morning cartoons or video games, kids and families would gather around the radio to listen to dramatically narrated stories, called serials. One of the popular serials of the 1930s followed the adventures of Orphan Annie and her dog Sandy. Even back then, no popular children’s program was without its share of branded merchandise and premium toys. The classic 1983 movie A Christmas Story depicted the main character Ralphie impatiently waiting to receive his Little Orphan Annie Secret Society decoder pin in the mail.

This 1938 edition of the Telematic Radio Orphan Annie Pin has two holes that reveal corresponding numbers and letters on a dial. The codes read during the end of the radio program could be deciphered by turning the dial to reveal the secret letter. Contrary to the disappointing Ovaltine message received by Ralphie in the movie, the actual codes gave a clue to what would happen in the next Radio Orphan Annie program. Visitors to the museum’s “Toys from the Attic: Stories of American Childhood” exhibit can view this pin along and decipher a message of their own (and we promise it’s not a crummy commercial)!

The Wonderful World of Walter Wick

Walter Wick exhibit

Anyone who has been to a Scholastic Book Fair in the last 20 years knows the joys of the I Spy and Can You See What I See? books. Think of the hours spent combing the pages for each meticulously placed object! The photographer behind the juvenile book series, Walter Wick, is featured in a retrospective exhibition at the Shelburne Museum this summer.

Walter Wick: Games, Gizmos and Toys in the Attic is a feast for the eyes comprised of Wick’s large-scale photographs and whimsical dioramas. Visitors of all ages are invited to search the visual puzzles for optical illusions and ever-elusive toys. Wick explained that the exhibit’s title “not only describes the contents of the show, but the contents of my head.” We hope he has no plans to declutter anytime soon!
Photo: Walter Wick, Mirror Maze from I Spy Fun House, 1993. Pigmented Inkjet Photograph, 50 x 36 in. Copyright Wick Studio. Organized by the New Britain Museum of American Art.

In Pursuit of Fun

trivial pursuit

Inspired by the popular board game, the Betty Brinn Children’s Museum partnered with Hasbro, Inc. to create Trivial Pursuit®: A 50-State Adventure. The interactive exhibit highlights unique facts about the states. Did you know that Trivial Pursuit originated from a Scrabble night gone wrong. Facing a game with missing pieces, two members of The Canadian Press set about creating their own board game. Two years after its release, the game had sold more than 20 million copies, establishing itself as a household name.

On view now at the Strong Museum of Play, exhibit visitors find their way through a series of games, puzzles, and trivia questions similar to those found in the traditional game. You can dress like a pioneer and climb into a covered wagon in Nebraska, or play a pinball game of baseball in Boston’s Fenway Park. There’s even a display that lets you change a tire in the Indianapolis 500 – minus the pressure of a ticking course clock and screaming fans, of course.

Photo: Trivial Pursuit Cards. Dirk1981, Wikimedia Commons.

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