Small Talk Tag: Inspiration

Get Your Game Face On

Hasbro Gaming lab

In 2015, Hasbro announced a new competition that was right up our alley: design a great game. They partnered with Indiegogo to find the next face-to-face party game. In order to run the competition, they founded the Hasbro Gaming Lab with the mission to discover and develop great new games, connect with the gaming community, and bring fresh experiences to gamers everywhere. Count us in!

After over 500 submissions, Dan Goodsell and his game, Irresponsibility – the Mr. Toast Card Game, took home the grand prize. Irresponsibility is a fast-paced card game for 2-4 players. Featuring Dan’s fun illustrations of his character, Mr. Toast, and his friends, the first player to gather 15 points wins. We’ll be first in line to buy Dan’s game when it premieres. And we may just start thinking about our next big party game idea in case Hasbro decides to have another challenge.
Photo: Courtesy of Hasbro.

 

Rolling Out Adaptive Toys

UNF Adaptive Toy Project

Toys can teach us lots of important life skills: how to run a household, how to change a diaper, and even how to delicately remove a wish bone. While kids are busy playing, toys simultaneously aid fundamental cognitive and motor skill development. As Mr. Rogers once said, “Play is really the work of childhood.”

For some kids with physical or mental disabilities the benefits of play can be harder to come by. Often, store-bought toys don’t accommodate for special conditions such as autism, cerebral palsy, Spina Bifida and muscular dystrophy. Enter the Adaptive Toy Project, an initiative through the University of North Florida’s (UNF) Neurodevelopment Systems course that modifies toys for children with disabilities, allowing ease of play. Student teams at UNF have retrofitted motorized toys with adaptive technologies that were custom designed with a specific child in mind. Know a child that would benefit from one of these custom cruisers? Referrals to the Adaptive Toy Project can be made through a licensed physical therapist.
Photo: Courtesy of University of North Florida.

Perfect for a Petite Appetite

Kawaii food

We love food. But a museum, fine-scale artwork, and food don’t exactly mix. Until now. Introducing kawaii cooking (no surprise here, kawaii is Japanese for cute), which uses real-life ingredients and miniature stoves, pots, pans, and utensils to create tiny, edible dishes. Smaller than your Easy Bake Oven, these miniature stoves are powered by tea lights or small flames.

We hope you have a small appetite for dumplings, spaghetti bolognese, cheeseburgers, and crepes. Just like any good cooking show, the sets change to match the recipe! Want to try it at home? Fire up your favorite internet browser! Most of the ingredients and utensils used in the videos are purchased in Japan.

Photo: AAAjoken YouTube channel.

Randy Hage’s New York Storefronts

Randy Hage

For decades, artists have been inspired by the bright lights and bustling streets of New York City. Visual artist Randy Hage is no exception. Hage spent 25 years creating sets, models, and props for television and film before a trip to New York in the late 1990s led him to his next project.

Originally photographing cast iron facades for future art projects, he became entranced by storefronts and the stories that they told. On subsequent trips, he found these ‘mom and pop’ stores disappearing, pushed out by big box stores and rising rents. So, he decided to recreate them in 1:12 scale as a permanent reminder of the establishments and the people who lived in them and served their community.

The results have blown us away, and we challenge you to determine which is the original and which is the miniature.
Photo: NYC Bodega in Miniature, courtesy of Randy Hage.

A Home for the Holidays

Custom made dollhouse

Forgoing the mall or busy big box stores to find the perfect Christmas gift can save your sanity during the holidays—especially if you’re crafty enough to make a custom, handmade gift. For three lucky Kansas City girls in 1971, a gift from their father was a dream come true: Thomas Baker constructed a dollhouse version of the family’s home in the city’s historic Ward Parkway neighborhood.

Baker’s replica of the 1928 Tudor Revival-style home aligns with the Victorian tradition of building personalized dollhouses. The exterior features painted brick and half-timber details along with the signature pointed gables. The inside of the dollhouse is a 1970s time capsule with bright (and rather groovy) wallpaper, and half walls to allow for easy access to the rooms. Above the hallway’s staircase on the second floor is a photograph of the three Baker sisters with a heart-melting note that reads, “To Janice, Jennifer and Julie, with love from your daddy.”

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