Small Talk Tag: Inspiration

Let’s Go Fly a Kite

kite exhibition

For centuries, kites have remained one of the most universal outdoor toys. A symbol of childhood and freedom, the playthings can be found everywhere from suburban America to Brazilian favelas to the villages of Japan. A new exhibit at the V&A Museum of Childhood prominently displays a colorful kaleidoscope of kites from Kabul, Afghanistan.

Kites from Kabul is a partnership between the museum and British charity Turquoise Mountain. Established in 2006, Turquoise Mountain’s Institute for Afghan Arts and Architecture teaches young Afghans traditional arts and crafts like calligraphy, ceramics, and jewelry-making. Videos and photographs of the children who made the kites accompany the installation. A product of the intersection of art and play, the kite exhibition aims to foster greater understanding of Afghan culture.
Photo: Andrew Quilty/Oculi, V&A Museum of Childhood.


Raggedy Ann Turns 100

raggedy ann

With her button eyes, triangle nose, candy-striped pantaloons and orange yarn hair, Raggedy Ann is one of the most recognizable dolls around. You might be surprised to learn that the raggedy redhead has gone through a only few updates in her 100 years as play icon. Ann’s 1915 patent shows her with very long thumbs, a teardrop-shaped nose, a puffy dress, and a floral bonnet with her namesake on a ribbon.

While much folklore surrounds her creation, we know that Raggedy Ann’s creator Johnny Gruelle created Raggedy Ann (and later Raggedy Andy) for the pages of children’s books. Set in his daughter Marcella’s nursery, Gruelle’s first book, The Raggedy Ann Stories, introduced the doll who embarked on a series of adventures: raiding the pantry, rescuing the family dog, and teaching tolerance to the other dolls in the nursery. You might say the secret to Raggedy Ann’s longevity lies in her softness—both literally and figuratively.

Miniature Museums Go Global

miniature museum

Can you imagine if one of our miniature artists created a scaled version of The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures? That’s so meta, right? You would probably need the power of the Hubble Telescope to see our collection!

In reality, that’s exactly what several artists are doing around the world. For example, in her traveling exhibit space, Gallery 1:10, Anna Lidberg exemplifies this phenomena in shows like If You Tolerate This. This special collection features two museum spaces. Miniature books created by Henrik Franklin sit on stands as if they were on display in one room while mini-television plays next door. Another Miniature Museum at Gemeentemuseum Den Haag features 2,000 works from over 850 famous artists including Roy Lichtenstein and Damien Hirst; all no larger than 10 x 10 x 10 centimeters. Each tiny work was produced specially for the museum. We like to think we’re trendsetters!
Photo: Courtesy of Henrik Franklin, and Gallery 1:10.

Oh, You Beautiful Bricks

Beautiful LEGO

There seems to be no limit to what you can build with LEGO bricks. In recent years, a major traveling exhibition of fantastical LEGO sculptures has graced museums nationwide. Additionally, LEGOLAND Discovery Centers popping up across the world allow fans to unleash their inner architect. In 2013, master builders at LEGO even built a life-sized Star Wars X-Wing entirely out of the inches-long plastic bricks!

LEGO’s versatility inspired graphic designer Mike Doyle to spend hours creating his fantastical and artistic designs. One of his major works was inspired by the housing crisis in 2009: dilapidated Victorian houses built entirely in grayscale colored bricks (without paint or glue!). Doyle decided to combine his two passions in a new book entitled, Beautiful LEGO.  The book features everything from fantastical science fiction scenes to life-like food sculptures. In addition to featuring his own work Doyle solicited images from aspiring LEGO artists around the world.

Photo: Mike Doyle, Courtesy of No Starch Press.

The Thief’s Delight

william morris strawberry thief wallpaper

File this one under “dream job!” Did you know that the V&A Museum has a Games Designer in Residence? Last October, Sophie George completed six months of research and created an interactive iPad experience to accompany an exhibit. The game is now available to the public in the Apple App Store.

The game, called “Strawberry Thief,” draws inspiration from a textile by the same name. A notable contributor to the British textile revival in the 1800s, William Morris’s wallpaper and textile designs transcended his time. His famous organic, repeating patterns continue to influence designers and artists today. Players and visitors to the museum can use their figure tips to draw and color the fabric’s intricate patterns. When the work is done, the image zooms out revealing the re-worked Morris piece in its entirety.
Photo: Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum. © Sophia George.

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