Small Talk Tag: Linda LaRoche

An Art Nouveau Spring

Jardiniere

As everyone begins dreaming of warmer weather and flowers blooming, we thought we’d take a look at Linda LaRoche’s jardinière. Your gardening plans may even involve a jardinière, a large usually ceramic flowerpot holder. Jardinières, from the French feminine form of gardener, tend to be highly decorated like LaRoche’s replica of Flora Marina, Flora Exotica by Emile Gallé.

Flora Marina, Flora Exotica was presented at the 1889 World’s Fair in Paris and now resides in Musée de l’École de Nancy. Devoted to the Nancy Art Nouveau movement founded in 1901 by several artists (including Gallé) in Nancy, Lorraine, France, the museum has over 400 of his glass and ceramic works. T/m houses the miniature version of the work that was 14 years in the making; see just what went into this specially commissioned piece over the next several weeks.

Love Chest Revisited

Hadley Chest Behind-the-Scenes

We always feel very fortunate here at The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures when artists give us a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of their masterpieces like this Hadley Chest by James Hastrich and Linda LaRoche. In order to accurately reproduce historical pieces such as the Hadley Chest at Historic Deerfield, museums grant artists access to collection objects so they can take detailed measurements and photographs.

In service to scale, miniature artists substitute woods like plum, pear, cherry and boxwood for the smaller grain. The smaller, tighter grain creates the same effect as the soft maple, chestnut, oak and white pine used on the full scale Hadley Chest.

Love Chest

HadleyChest

The full-scale version of this Hadley Chest belonged to Hepzibah Dickinson. Carved with her initials in the inner panel, she received it as a wedding gift when she married Jonathan Belding of Northfield, Massachusetts in 1720. A traditional gift for the time, it would have been on every bride’s Target Wedding Registry (kidding!). Hadley chests are heavy, wide-board, mortise-and-tenoned chests painted and elaborately carved with leaves and flat flowers (tulips were the most popular). The chest’s name derives from its place and time period of origin: western Massachusetts between 1680 and 1740.

We doubt our version would store all of Hepzibah’s clothes and linens! The 1/12-inch scale chest by Linda LaRoche and James Hastrich is a replica of the full-scale version in the furniture collection of Historic Deerfield. The miniature Hadley chest was also the result of a happy union: it is the first collaborative piece of the artists. In 2011, LaRoche and Hastrich visited T/m to talk about their labor of love.

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