Small Talk Tag: Miniature

School is Now in Session

IGMA Guild School

Where do miniature artists hone their craft or (quite literally) learn the tools of the trade? Sadly, no, the answer isn’t a miniature version of Hogwarts. Every summer, the International Guild of Miniature Artisans (IGMA) hosts students in Castine, Maine for six-days of workshops and classes led by some of the world’s leading fine-scale miniature artists.

The event, known as Guild School, welcomes all skill levels from beginner to advanced. This year, participants can learn silversmithing, leathercrafting, wheel-thrown pottery, pizza making (yes!) and more from some of our favorite artists, including Pete Acquisto and William R. Robertson. Do you dabble in miniature making and want to build your skills? An annual Guild School Scholarship is available to a promising artist. Who knows, maybe your work will end up in a museum someday!
Photo: Courtesy of IGMA Guild School.

The Write Stuff

john davenport miniature

Several things might come to mind when you think of the word “secretary:” Dolly Parton’s character in the movie 9 to 5, current U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, or maybe even the 1973 Triple Crown winner… oh wait, that’s Secretariat. In furniture, a secretary refers to a large cabinet with drawers, compartments, and a flat writing surface. Historically, secretaries vary in size, style, and functionality from very ornate to compact and sleek. Long before Siri sent emails for us, secretaries were all the rage.

Miniature artist John Davenport created the German Secretary pictured here based on designs from eighteenth-century schreibschränke (or writing cabinets). The secretary has 23 drawers fitted with brass hardware; three of which have a working lock and key. Most notably, a pair of one-point perspective marquetry landscapes adorn the outside, the larger of which is on the hinged panel that becomes the writing surface when opened. If you were about five inches tall, this secretary would be the perfect piece of furniture to pen your memoir, write a letter, or work on your blog!

Miniature Museums Go Global

miniature museum

Can you imagine if one of our miniature artists created a scaled version of The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures? That’s so meta, right? You would probably need the power of the Hubble Telescope to see our collection!

In reality, that’s exactly what several artists are doing around the world. For example, in her traveling exhibit space, Gallery 1:10, Anna Lidberg exemplifies this phenomena in shows like If You Tolerate This. This special collection features two museum spaces. Miniature books created by Henrik Franklin sit on stands as if they were on display in one room while mini-television plays next door. Another Miniature Museum at Gemeentemuseum Den Haag features 2,000 works from over 850 famous artists including Roy Lichtenstein and Damien Hirst; all no larger than 10 x 10 x 10 centimeters. Each tiny work was produced specially for the museum. We like to think we’re trendsetters!
Photo: Courtesy of Henrik Franklin, henrikfranklin.com and Gallery 1:10.

Seeing Double: The Devil’s in the Details

william r. robertson

And details there are! We’ve never tried it ourselves, but given a steady hand and a pair of tweezers, each microscopic door latch in Twin Manors can be locked with a sliver of a key. Every window glides open in its frame except for two fake windows on each side of the façade. These provide symmetry to the home, which was a very important aspect of Georgian-era design. And artist William R. Robertson even painted the brickwork with pigment made from the dust of 18th century brick!

Next time you visit T/m look closely and you can see a sampler in the back hallway by Robertson’s mom Esther Robertson. The sampler commemorates the completion of the two houses; the one in T/m’s home is dated 1989 for the first year the manor was on display. Come see it for yourself August 1, 2015 when the museum reopens!

Seeing Double: Dining in a Manor

Miniature dining room furniture

Like the rest of Twin Manors, the dining room took inspiration from 18th century homes: Wilton-on-the-James (c. 1753 in Virginia) and Wentworth-Gardner House (c. 1760 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire). The paneling on the back wall contains approximately 250 pieces of wood. Look closely and you can see the hidden doorway leading to the pantry in the back hallway on the left wall.

Not to be outdone for the holidays, Twin Manors has historically accurate Christmas decorations. Every holiday season the T/m staff decks the manor’s halls with swags and fruit arrangements (well, not real fruit… that wouldn’t be great for the art). The dining room chandelier is replaced with a Christmas chandelier and a festive bonbon centerpiece adorns the table along with a Williamsburg pineapple centerpiece.

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