Small Talk Tag: Miniature

Concluding An Art Nouveau Spring

Jardinere with Ruler

Spring turned into summer in the blink of an eye, so it’s time to wrap up our behind-the-scenes look at Linda LaRoche’s jardinière! After researching, sketching, carving, and assembling the pieces, LaRoche was almost finished with her jardinière. She faced one last challenge: it is a planter after all, and the full-scale jardinière has a watertight liner. How could LaRoche create a miniature liner?

The ingenious solution? Old paint tubes! LaRoche cut apart some of her used paint tubes and removed their inner lead liners. She flattened the liners, fitted them to the interior of the jardiniere’s basin, and voila! Every detail of the jardinière, from the precise carvings to the basin’s liner, matched the full-scale piece. After fourteen years of work, the jardinière was finally complete and ready for its place in the Masterpiece Gallery at T/m! We hope you enjoyed this journey through LaRoche’s creative process and are as inspired as we are by her ingenuity and dedication!

Take a Picture, It’ll Last Longer

Simpson Charger

Have you ever gone into an art museum and wished you could take one of the pieces home? While we may take a picture, artist LeeAnn Chellis Wessel decided to take it one step further! With advanced art degrees, Chellis Wessel knew the technical aspects of creating pottery. But it wasn’t until she began creating period appropriate ceramics as gifts to furnish her mother’s miniature Colonial Revival house that she developed a passion for replicating the old masters in one-inch scale.

Chellis Wessel’s miniature artistry thrives from an interest in comparing and contrasting the style, period, form, function, and even geographic origin of the artworks, such as this charger that she reproduced from the collection at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. She enjoys musing about the work’s original home, “I’ve always been really interested in… the historical aspect of what kinds of pieces were appropriate for this type of house, style, and period.”

While The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures is closed for renovation, see this charger and more, along with some of their full-scale counterparts, on view now through February 22, 2015 at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

“The Finish and Color… is the Magic For Me”

Faux Paint Samples

Originally a maker of full-sized furniture (do you see another theme here?!), James Hastrich became engrossed in miniature making after constructing a 1/12th scale desk for a client. So much so that in 1977 he sold his furniture shop and fully devoted his time to the art of producing Early American painted furniture in fine-scale. Hastrich hand paints all of his pieces using traditional methods and materials.

The artist’s sample box is based on one owned by Moses Eaton, a traveling painter specializing in faux graining and stenciling. Unlike the DIYers with their plastic grocery bag techniques today, the decorative painters of the 18th and 19th century were highly skilled. Eaton’s work adorned the walls of homes along the East Coast between 1800 and 1830. Hastrich replicated Eaton’s wood paint samples using historical methods such as vinegar grainingsmoke graining, and brush stroke graining.

Under a Magnifying Glass

Goddard-Townsend Secretary

While we wish that we could walk into The Metropolitan Museum of Art to measure, study, and photograph a 200-year-old secretary, we aren’t all fortunate enough to be miniature artists. For Paul Runyon, this was just the first step in crafting a miniature version of the Goddard-Townsend block and shell desk and bookcase. Made by the Goddards and Townsends, two intermarried 18th century Rhode Island furniture-making families, the desk gets its name from the raised blocks and carved shells on its surface.

Runyon was so particular that he was known to discard his plans for a miniature if he couldn’t make every single part in exact 1/12th scale. He worked under a magnifying glass to assemble the secretary because some of the pieces are as thin as .028 (or 7/250th) of an inch. It took him almost a year to complete this extraordinary work of art.

Assembling an Art Nouveau Spring

Jardinere PiecingTogether

After researching the full-scale jardinière, sketching the designs, and carving the base for the fine-scale miniature, artist Linda LaRoche created the basin of the jardinière by hollowing and carving blocks of plum wood to shape the sides. The next challenge was creating the delicate animals, people, and foliage that decorate the curved walls of the container.

Using a method known as marquetry, LaRoche sketched the design onto the basin’s wooden surface and then traced a copy of the design onto paper. LaRoche placed the paper copy over thin pieces of wood called veneer in order to carve an outline of the design into the wood. This process left LaRoche with hundreds of tiny pieces of carved wood that perfectly matched the original sketch. Now for the fun part! LaRoche had an intricate jigsaw puzzle to complete; she assembled the tiny veneer pieces over the sketched design on the basin’s surface. One side of the basin’s design consists of over 150 tiny pieces of wood; each was individually laid and glued on the surface, taking LaRoche two and a half years (out of the fourteen needed for the entire piece) to complete.

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