Small Talk Tag: Miniature

Paintings for Ants

Lorraine Loots

It’s not often that an artist gets to exhibit over 700 of his or her works in a solo gallery show. For Lorraine Loots, this feat was accomplished at Brooklyn, New York’s Three Kings Studio, in part because all of her highly detailed paintings are no larger than 1 inch by 1 inch. The 2015 gallery show, Ants in NYC, was her first international exhibition, which is pretty impressive since she hadn’t intended to become a professional artist.

Loots’s paintings began to take the spotlight back in 2013 with her Paintings for Ants series. She made a commitment to paint one tiny work for one hour per day as a way to stay in touch with her creative side while working a 9 to 5 office job. Not long after posting her work on Instagram, she began amassing followers and receiving numerous requests to purchase her tiny paintings. Today, Loots’s miniature art has been so widely featured that she has committed her work life to painting. Goes to show that sometimes you should quit your day job!
Photo: Lorraine Loots.

Allegory of a Lullaby: The Dreamy Details

Johannes landman

Johannes Landman’s miniature Dutch cradle is entitled Allegory of a Lullaby. What exactly is an allegory? We’re glad you asked! In visual art, an allegory uses figures or characters as symbols to illustrate an overall theme, value, or moral. The allegory of Landman’s cradle illustrates themes of childhood.

All four painted panels feature cherubs in a variety of actions: happily dancing, sheltering an infant, and even recoiling in loneliness. The cradle’s headboard panel depicts a muse playing a lullaby that “rocks” the cradle.

Landman is not only a master of painting, but also of miniature woodworking. For this work, he used dogwood from his home province, British Columbia, and added 22 karat gold accents.

A Gilded Palace Comes to America

Catherine Palace

It’s hard not to be amazed by Russia’s eighteenth century Catherine Palace. With its sky blue and gold gilded façade, the building is three stories of “whipped cream” Rococo architecture. The interior is equally stunning: grand halls with marquetry floors, ornately-painted ceilings, and, of course, wall-to-wall flowery molding dripping with gold leaf.

Private collector Carole Kaye commissioned Robert Dawson of The Modelroom to miniaturize the fairy tale magic of the Catherine Palace. Nearly a decade later, the finished product has been gifted to the Kathleen Savage Browning Miniatures Collection at the Kentucky Gateway Museum (on view through April 30, 2016). One of the most stunning rooms in the miniature palace is a 1:12 scale interpretation of the Amber Room, in which Dawson hand painted and engraved hundreds of pieces of veneer to emulate amber. The full-scale Amber Room was once considered the “eighth wonder of the world.” Maybe the miniature Catherine Palace could be considered for the ninth!
Photo: KSB Miniatures Collection.

Allegory of a Lullaby: The Inspiration

Johannes Landman

Many of the artists represented in T/m’s fine-scale miniature collection draw inspiration from history, architecture, and the natural world. However, Johannes Landman also turned to his own personal history as inspiration for this beautiful cradle, titled Allegory of a Lullaby.

Formally, the cradle is based on a traditional Dutch cradle with four panels and delicately carved scrollwork details. Like much of his work, Landman emulated the style of the Dutch Old Masters for the allegorical scenes on each side of the cradle. Informally, the most touching source of inspiration for this work can be noted by the fact that he often calls this work “Christina’s Cradle,” in reference to his mother, who died when he was an infant. The work, which took over 1,100 hours to plan and create, is a tribute to every child who has lost a mother.

American Folk Art in Furniture

Folk art furniture

If you’ve been following our blog for a while now, you know that fine-scale miniature artists Jim Ison and Therese Bahl didn’t stop once the bones of the room were finished. They had to furnish it! For “A Tribute to the Classic Period of American Folk Art,” Ison and Bahl made sure they had plenty of seating. Ison created two spindle back chairs with tan leather seats, a Windsor chair painted green, and a Martha Washington chair based on a circa 1800 model upholstered in flowered print. Bahl made a black Hitchcock chair based on a circa 1830s Connecticut model with painted gold designs, and a pink sidechair with painted fruit, flowers, and accents.

With plenty of places to sit, Bahl added a wood swing table with a rural house scene and a black metal deed box with painted embellishments. Ison contributed a mahogany writing desk with six drawers and accessories, an octagonal-topped mahogany tilt top table based on a circa 1800 model with spade feet, and a clock for the mantle with a painted landscape and gold finials. Together, they created a yellow Boston rocker with an ocean scene and a decoratively painted side table. While this may be just another project in the life of a fine-scale miniature artist, we, for one, are exhausted!

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