Small Talk / Toys

Chop Shop

toy butcher shop

Victorian life was not for the faint of heart. While we may be used to ground beef or pork chops neatly packaged in Styrofoam and shrink wrap, that wasn’t always the case. Most Victorians were used to perusing dangling meat in storefront windows at their local butcher shop, just like this toy version from our collection. Although it may seem grisly as a toy, this child-sized charcuterie was meant to teach kids the grown-up skills of grocery shopping and business. What’s more, actual shops of the time period embraced their utility too, often using them as unique advertisements in store windows.

While a similar example exists in our collection, the toy butcher shop shown here is from the Victoria and Albert Museum of Childhood. Created in 1900 by the Christian Hacker Toy Company, this shop includes a friendly figurine that invites children and visitors alike to come closer and take in all of its details. Small wooden replicas of raw meat hang in the archways, and although the furniture inside appears oversized, it is all original to the piece.

Photo: Butcher Shop, c. 1900, Christian Hacker, Germany. Courtesy of the V&A Museum of Childhood.

Sew-Handy Dandy

toy singer sewing machine

It’s just about that time of year again: time to make your New Year’s Resolution. Why not pick up a new hobby or learn a new skill this year? Maybe it’s time to dust off that old sewing machine you inherited and give it a whirl! In 1910 the Singer Manufacturing Co. began producing Singer model no. 20. Nicknamed the Sew-Handy in the 1950s, it became the most popular child-sized sewing machine. Since the machine was simply a miniature version of a full-size sewing machine, it was also marketed as a lightweight travel machine for adults. Originally sold for about $3, it features a hand crank that created a simple chain-stitch.

The Singer Sew-Handy remained in production until 1975 with only 4 variations. This Singer Sew-Handy from the T/m collection appears to be a second generation machine dating somewhere from 1914 and 1926 based upon the number of spokes on the hand crank. We wonder how many fabulous doll wardrobes were created by young seamstresses practicing their skills on a machine like this one.

Getting the Lead Out

Lead Soldiers with Mold

December brings holiday cheer, chestnuts roasting on an open fire, and toy safety! The nation’s leading volunteer eye health and safety organization, Prevent Blindness America has declared December to be Safe Toys and Gifts Month “in order to keep the holiday season joyful for everyone.” Toy safety is a top priority, and organizations like the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission have also released safety tips and guidelines for buying and playing with toys.

Safe toys haven’t always been the standard. In the past, kids played with tiny steam engines, used candles to light up the interiors of their toy train stations and dollhouses, and even handled dangerous lead to cast their own toy soldiers. Anyone could buy blocks of lead and use a casting set to create toy armies and figures. This was marketed as an “easy and safe” activity…at least until the harmful side effects of lead were discovered and safety regulations were enforced in the 1960s and ‘70s. According to this article in Popular Science, just one of these lead soldiers contains enough lead to render several million toys unfit for sale in the U.S. by today’s standards. We don’t think Santa will be bringing any kids a lead casting set for Christmas this year!

Keep on Truckin’

hess toy trucks

East Coasters will notice a big change after this holiday season. A roadside staple, Hess gas stations will all change their name to Speedway. Why are we mentioning this on Small Talk? Because it’s also the last year the Hess’s classic green trucks will be available for purchase at their stations. It’s truly the end of an era! Hess gas stations began carrying small toys during the 1960 holiday season. As a survivor of the Great Depression, founder Leon Hess desired to create small, affordable toy cars that came complete with batteries. The Hess 1964 Tanker Trailer sold for less than five dollars.

Fifty years later, Hess has established itself as a desirable outlet for collectors and children’s playthings in the United States. In light of the celebration, the company is offering a commemorative heavy-duty, flatbed truck with modern additions like motion and button-activated sounds, retractable landing gear, and folding wings. For more modern Hess fans, the company has also created a space cruiser complete with a large cargo bay that houses a small scouter plane. Although the trucks will roll out of the stations forever, don’t fret, the Hess line of transportation toys will still be available for purchase online.

What’s the story, wishbones?

Victorian fancies

The superstition of wishing upon a wishbone can be traced back centuries to England, Rome and even ancient times. Anyone with siblings, cousins or even a surly aunt or uncle knows it’s always a race to see who gets the honor of pulling the wishbone apart. This set of wishbone furniture must have taken some of the drama out of family holidays!

A lot of turkeys and hens were were cooked up in order to collect enough wishbones to create this unique set of dollhouse furniture. In the 19th century, it became very fashionable for women to save up everyday scrap items like bones, feathers, and quills and turn them into spectacular crafts known as Victorian fancies. Sets of furniture like this one were some of the most popular Victorian fancies to make. After all, your dollhouse family needs tables and chairs for their Thanksgiving feast too!

Page 5 of 15« First...34567...10...Last »