Small Talk Tag: Toy

Eleanor’s Fashionable Friend

French Fashion Doll.

In addition to teaching children necessary grown-up skills, dolls and toys have imagination-fueled stories all their own. Sometimes we’re lucky enough to hear toys’ playtime stories and special adventures toys had from the grown-ups who loved them. Other times, we have to do a little digging. This bisque fashion doll, for example, came to T/m with a few clues from her Victorian past.

With the help of previous her owners’ records, we know that this circa-1860 doll was owned by a girl in Buffalo, New York, named Eleanor Crocker. Nicknamed “Nellie,” the doll was passed down through several generations of Eleanor’s descendants before she became part of the museum’s collection. According to family lore, Nellie was brought back from France by Eleanor’s uncle Dexter as a gift. Through the magic of modern technology, we’ve been able to track down the family’s historical records including Dexter’s passport applications dating to the 1860s! While we may never know the exact playtime parties Nellie attended, we do know that Eleanor took excellent care of her.

A Home for the Holidays

Custom made dollhouse

Forgoing the mall or busy big box stores to find the perfect Christmas gift can save your sanity during the holidays—especially if you’re crafty enough to make a custom, handmade gift. For three lucky Kansas City girls in 1971, a gift from their father was a dream come true: Thomas Baker constructed a dollhouse version of the family’s home in the city’s historic Ward Parkway neighborhood.

Baker’s replica of the 1928 Tudor Revival-style home aligns with the Victorian tradition of building personalized dollhouses. The exterior features painted brick and half-timber details along with the signature pointed gables. The inside of the dollhouse is a 1970s time capsule with bright (and rather groovy) wallpaper, and half walls to allow for easy access to the rooms. Above the hallway’s staircase on the second floor is a photograph of the three Baker sisters with a heart-melting note that reads, “To Janice, Jennifer and Julie, with love from your daddy.”

Dollhouse Therapy

Dollhouses for Kids Battling Cancer

What started as a hobby, became a cause and grew into a movement. In 2006, a woman named Ann made her first dollhouse. Having enjoyed making it, but having no real purpose for it, she sold it at a loss. Her daughter, who was working with children undergoing chemo at the nearby hospital, suggested that next time she donate it to the hospital.

In no time, Dollhouses For Kids Battling Cancer was born. As of 2014, Ann had made and donated more than 336 dollhouses to children in 21 states, and even Canada! Several businesses have partnered with Ann to provide her with supplies, including The Magical Dollhouse.

But Ann couldn’t get the dollhouses to the kids without the help of her “Dollhouse Delivery Angels.” She has 105 angels in 37 states that help transport the dollhouses from Ann’s home in New York across the country. Each angel drives an average of 489 miles to deliver dollhouses. We think they’re all angels; check out Ann’s Facebook page to see how you can join their ranks!
Photo: Courtesy of Dollhouses For Kids Battling Cancer.

Cheers! Prost!

german wedding toasting cup

From Oktoberfest celebrations to biergartens, Germans definitely know how to drink in style. This uniquely designed figural toasting cup is rooted in the rich cultural and folk traditions of the country. The origins of the design come from a folk tale in which the daughter of a nobleman fell in love with a commoner who was a goldsmith. The wealthy nobleman locked the goldsmith away, but eventually agreed to let him marry his daughter if he could make a chalice from which two people can drink at the same time without spilling one single drop. Of course the goldsmith created this hinged cup to make the feat possible, and the rest was history. How’s that for German engineering!

Although not a fine-scale miniature, this cup is much smaller than life-sized, and resides in the Josephine Bird Dollhouse along with many of Josephine’s European souvenirs and artistic furnishings. We like to imagine that two of Josephine’s dolls had a very fancy wedding ceremony and enacted the traditional “Who Runs the Nest” toast using this cup.

Crack the Code

Little Orphan Annie Secret Decoder Pin

Decades before Saturday morning cartoons or video games, kids and families would gather around the radio to listen to dramatically narrated stories, called serials. One of the popular serials of the 1930s followed the adventures of Orphan Annie and her dog Sandy. Even back then, no popular children’s program was without its share of branded merchandise and premium toys. The classic 1983 movie A Christmas Story depicted the main character Ralphie impatiently waiting to receive his Little Orphan Annie Secret Society decoder pin in the mail.

This 1938 edition of the Telematic Radio Orphan Annie Pin has two holes that reveal corresponding numbers and letters on a dial. The codes read during the end of the radio program could be deciphered by turning the dial to reveal the secret letter. Contrary to the disappointing Ovaltine message received by Ralphie in the movie, the actual codes gave a clue to what would happen in the next Radio Orphan Annie program. Visitors to the museum’s “Toys from the Attic: Stories of American Childhood” exhibit can view this pin along and decipher a message of their own (and we promise it’s not a crummy commercial)!

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