Small Talk Tag: IGMA Fellow

The gods are in the Details

johannes landman miniature paintings

What do John Hancock, Jan Van Eyck, and Johannes Landman have in common? Other than names that start with J, each of these fellows have a signature signature. In true, miniature tradition, however, it would take a trained eye to spot Landman’s tiny signature within the gold-plated brass rosette on T/m’s miniature harpsichord.

Tiny playful carvings of a mermaid and satyr flank the piece’s tiny keys. The mermaid between the posts is actually carved from a single piece. Landman paid special attention to this portion of the harpsichord, carving her head in such a way that it appears to tilt. Her tiny crown was skillfully turned on a small lathe and attached later.

Landman modeled the painting under the lid after one on a full-sized Flemish harpsichord and it is entitled Musical Contest Between Apollo and Marsyas, Judged by King Midas. The painting depicts the Greek goddess of wisdom, Athena, rejecting her flute because of the ugly face she made when playing it. A nearby satyr, Marsyas, makes her jealous by mastering the instrument and a duel between him and Apollo, the god of music, ensues. Things don’t end up well for the loser, Marsyas, who then gets turned into a wine flask—ouch.

Miniature Master: Johannes Landman

johannes landman miniatures

You just never know where your career will take you. Johannes Landman previously worked for a firm issuing driver’s licenses before turning to his passion of fine-scale miniatures. Born in Holland, the self-taught artist drew inspiration from his grandmother, also a painter, and from work of the 17th Century Dutch masters when he began creating art. Now living in Canada, Landman makes his living transforming veneered wood, copper, and silk into masterful miniature oil paintings that can be found in museums and private collections worldwide. Landman also teaches at the International Guild of Miniatures Artisans.

He is said to believe that anyone can be a miniature artist as long as he or she has the passion to do so and doesn’t make earning money the end goal. Unafraid of challenges, Landman stretched his talent a little to create the ornate miniature harpsichord, now part of T/m’s permanent collection. The small piece actually plays when its keys are pressed, and its designs reflect the artistic flare and attention to detail exhibited in the artist’s framed paintings.

Seeing Double

lee ann chellis wessel miniature painting

In Kansas City, you can see the same painting in two different museums located only blocks apart. But, how could that be?! That’s because one is a miniature at The National Museum of Toys and Miniatures! Lee-Ann Chellis Wessel, an IGMA Fellow since 1989, added egg tempera painting to her repertoire after traveling and studying in Italy. She reproduces works of “The Old Masters,” such as Gherardo di Jacopo Starna, on tiny wooden panels. Adoration of the Magi can be seen in full-scale at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Art museums across the world feature masterpieces depicting the Adoration of the Magi, the name traditionally given to images of three kings, or wise men, visiting Jesus in the nativity after following a star to find him. The three magi, commonly considered to be Melchior (a Persian scholar), Caspar (an Indian scholar), and Balthazar (an Arabian scholar), bring Jesus gifts. They’re not at the top of our wish list, but they were ordinary offerings for a king: gold (a valuable metal), frankincense (used as a perfume), and myrrh (used as an anointing oil).